Tag Archives: kids

Snow Day Giveaway – Win an Autographed CD

Show us your child's colored-in page and win a CD

Give your kids something fun to do on this snow day and you could win an autographed copy of our new CD, “Everyone’s Invited!”

Just open and print any of the 4 coloring pages below, have your kids color in any page and take a picture of the page. Then, post the artwork to our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/JungleGymJam 

The first family to post a colored-in page will win a personalized, autographed CD of our new album, “Everyone’s Invited!” Good luck and have fun coloring!

Everyone's Invited! Coloring Page
Illustration by Melissa Bailey
The Pick Song coloring page
Illustration by Rickman Graphics
Everyone’s Invited! Album Cover Coloring Page The Pick Song Coloring Page
Peek-a-boo Moon Coloring Page
Illustration by Hannah Tuohy Illustrations
 Mimi_the_Ladybug_Coloring_Page_Thumb
Peek-a-boo Moon Coloring Page   Mimi the Ladybug Coloring Page

New Music Video: “A Bowling Party”

Here’s our latest music video, directed by Brian Fitzpatrick: “A Bowling Party.”

We filmed it at Eagle Rock Lanes in West Orange, NJ and had such a great time making this fun video for you!

Get the story behind the song.

Download on iTunes

The Jungle Gym Jam is:

Jason Didner – lead vocals, guitar
Casey McCleary – harmony vocals, guitar
Judy Helbig – bass guitar, harmony vocals
Ross Kantor – drums, harmony vocals

In the recording studio:

Meg Beattie, harmony vocals
Produced and engineered by Dave Cushing, Snowdome Studios, Montclair, NJ
Mastered by Scott Anthony, The Viewing Room, Maplewood, NJ

 

When Do You Tell a Grown-up?

An anti-bullying poem by Jason Didner

When do you tell a grown-up?

When do you tell a grown-up
Of something that’s not right?
Is it really tattling
If you can stop a fight?

A tattle-tale can’t wait to tell
Of picky little things
Like Josh’s messy desk
Or Emma’s loose binder rings

Young heroes tell their grown-ups
Of big things they come across
Of kids on playgrounds and online
Causing fear and pain and loss

It takes courage to put what’s right
Before what other kids might say
The rewards are so much greater
Like a safer place to play

A place where kids trust other kids
To always have their backs
And bullies know their hurtful games
Will be stopped in their tracks

Then some bullies won’t be bullies
They’ll learn a better way
To treat their fellow youngsters
As they go about their day

And those who cling to bullying
To deal with what’s inside
No matter what the grown-ups do
No matter how they try

They’ll be without an audience
To cheer on their bad acts
Their power will be less and less
You’ll get your safety back

A code of silence only makes
A scary place to be
Where only the aggressive kids
Feel comfortable and free

You’re not a snitch when you can save
A child from so much grief
Stomach aches every morning
Your act would bring relief

When all your friends will speak up
When they’re seeing something wrong
Your whole class will stand together
United, brave and strong

So when do you tell a grown-up
When’s the time to raise an alert?
Now you’ve learned it’s never tattling
When a child is being hurt

Making Moments on Movie Night in Montclair (Part 1 of 2)

Last Friday night’s performance at the Montclair Film Festival’s Summer Screening was all about creating moments – and, like all do-it-yourself performance propositions, it was also about problem solving, determination, and connecting with the joy of what we’re doing. These themes played off each other in the weeks running up to the show and straight through the performance and packing up afterwards.

A Cool Invitation

I was honored that Lisa from the Montclair Film Festival asked me to perform at one of this year’s outdoor summer screenings, as a follow-up to last year’s solo acoustic performance of mostly 50s rock before a screening of Grease. This time, the movie was Men in Black and the band was to perform from 8:00 until about 8:45, with the movie set to start about 9:00 when it got dark enough outside.  The location would be Montclair’s bustling Church Street with its sidewalk cafes, boutiques, and art galleries. The one-way street would be closed to car traffic and a giant screen would be placed in the roadway.

Jason Didner and the Jungle Gym Jam

The opportunities to create wonderful moments were apparent from the early stages of communicating with Lisa to make the show happen. Then, the challenges began to surface: Can the whole band make it? What if I play as a solo or duo? We’re a kids’ band whose song themes are inspired by my toddler. How can we adapt our show to create appealing moments for tweens (upper-elementary and middle-schoolers) who will more likely be at a sci-fi comedy thriller like Men in Black, which begins past the bedtime of our usual audience? Do we have all the necessary equipment to pull off this show ourselves?

Preparing for New Situations

Scheduling problems came to light: Everyone could make it to the gig except our drummer Ross. So I reached out to Montclair drummers Miguel Rodriguez, a rock drummer who is in the Parents Who Rock organization with me, and Bruce Tyler, a jazz/blues drummer who seems to be at every musical event in and around town. Bruce couldn’t make it; Miguel had a potential conflict that might require some fancy footwork on everyone’s part, including the Film Festival organizers. He was set to run sound for a performance elsewhere in Montclair that night.

Jason Didner and the Jungle Gym Jam - Miguel and Jason

Fortunately, Miguel was able to reschedule his other commitment and dedicate the whole night to sitting in with us. Now we had a new dilemma: He could only rehearse with us once: the week of the gig, on a night no one else could make. So, I set up a one-on-one rehearsal with Miguel. He was a quick study and we ran through every song once, tightening up some spots where the music changes and working out the song endings. Peanut listened in to our session on the basement stairs with Amy, staying up pretty late. When she decided it was time for bed, I took a 5-minute break to take her upstairs, give her one last change and tuck her in. Amy read Peanut a book while I went back down to complete our rehearsal. I was feeling a lot more confident about how Friday would work out.

I got in one more rehearsal with Ross, Casey and Judy on Thursday and we were mostly able to concentrate on running through the setlist, which I had figured would be about 14 songs for a 45-minute set. It was a good opportunity to go back over some songs we hadn’t rehearsed together in a while. We also worked out some songs from my pre-Jungle Gym Jam repertoire, like Jackals on the Prowl and Glass Half Full. At the end of rehearsal, I spoke with the band about the importance of creating moments on stage – with eye contact and interaction among us onstage. This was as ready as we were going to be for Friday without everyone ever being in the same rehearsal at the same time. I prepared with everyone as best I could and took the rest of the outcome on faith.

Another problem to solve and an opportunity to create moments came up. We knew we’d be performing out in the street at dusk with dim street lighting that would render us nearly invisible to an audience. I researched lighting options that could be used in a special situation like this, and came up with 150-watt clip-on work lights from Home Depot, along with compact fluorescent bulbs that would not burn as hot as incandescents. I would clip these lamps to the speaker poles to light the band. On the night of the gig, those lights helped us make the most of each onstage moment to delight the audience.

Clip-on light from Home Depot

Getting There is Half the Battle

Friday, as we drove to the venue, we saw that Church Street was physically blocked off with nobody attending to the street’s entrance. With three cars full of musical equipment, this put us in an awkward position with how best to unload our equipment and bring it to the stage. I ended up making two trips from the 3rd floor of the parking garage (taking the elevator) to the spot on Church Street where we’d be playing, first carrying our PA system, and then on a return trip, carrying my guitar amp.

Judy was certain that there must be a way to get her car closer to the stage. Just as we were discussing it, Lisa greeted us and I asked her if we could move the barricades to get the band loaded in. Lisa agreed and we had some great help from a Montclair police officer in getting Judy’s car parked near the stage. We unloaded the rest of the equipment and I threw my entire concentration into setting up our gear as quickly as possible. We were getting close to show time and my bandmates asked where Miguel was. I said I couldn’t worry about trying to track him down; he had earlier posted an announcement about the gig on Facebook so I was certain he didn’t forget. I wasn’t willing to take my eye off the ball in terms of setting us up for the show. As I was connecting the cables and getting ready to start up the PA, Miguel arrived with all his drums neatly stacked on a hand cart. He did a quick setup and was ready to go as soon as our microphones and guitars were on and tested.

I decided to give my guitar wireless rig a second chance, this time using it for the electric guitar. After all, I wouldn’t be moving around as large of a space this time. Even in a confined space, the guitar wireless system was dropping out for a moment here and there, depending on where I moved. This experience confirmed my need to upgrade to a better wireless system, which I just did today. I enjoy the freedom of being untethered from a cable, which frees me up to give kids my very best stage presence.

I hooked up the lights, which, judging from the photos, gave us more the look and feel of a real show on a summer evening. I laid out my setlist (after a little scrambling to remember where I put it). We were ready to rock!

To be continued…

When you’ve prepared a special event – a party, ceremony, corporate event or concert, what problems have you had to solve? How did you do it? Did you keep your composure? How much could you work out in advance? How much did you have to take on faith? How did your preparation lead to creating unforgettable moments?

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